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Communist Manifesto for IT/ITES Employees

Today marks the 200th birth anniversary of the greatest revolutionary teacher Karl Marx.

Born in Germany 200 years ago, Marx laid bare the essence of capitalism, laws governing capitalist development and established that proletarian socialist revolution is the inevitable result of inherent contradictions in the capitalistic mode of production.

He dedicated his whole life in scientific pursuit. He remained steadfast on the path of uncompromising scientific thinking and practice. His great capacity to grasp the world with all its complexities and dynamic changes is revealed in each one of his writings.

In 21st century capitalism has grown into moribund corporate capitalism. Capitalistic ideology keeps the world in its death grip. Corporate quest for more and more profits pushes majority of people and natural resources in to a deeper and deeper crisis. In this situation, the life and works of Karl Marx is more relevant than every before.

As a tribute to Marx’s life, and to remind ourselves of the duty to be completed in 21st century by the working class, we publish a adapted version of a part of Communist Manifesto written jointly by Karl Marx and his life long friend and collaborator Frederik Engels.

This modification clearly reveals the manifesto’s continuing relevance to modern IT/ITES employees. We replaced proletariat with IT/ITES employees, in bourgeois with corporates, factory with IT company and some other changes. All changes are indicated in different color and the original text is given at the end.

You can read the complete Text of Manifesto at Marxists Org

IT/ITES employees class go through various stages of development. With its birth begins its struggle with the corporates. At first the contest is carried on by individual employees, then by the employees of a company, then by the operative of one trade, in one locality, against the individual corporate who directly exploits them. They direct their attacks not against the corporate conditions of production, but against the instruments of production themselves; they oppose foreign labour that compete with their labour. […]

At this stage, the employees still form an incoherent mass scattered over the whole country, and broken up by their mutual competition. If anywhere they unite to form more compact bodies, this is not yet the consequence of their own active union, but of the union of the corporates, which class, in order to attain its own political ends, is compelled to set the whole IT/ITES employees class in motion, and is moreover yet, for a time, able to do so. At this stage, therefore, the employees do not fight their enemies, but the enemies of their enemies, the remnants of absolute monarchy, the landowners, the non-industrial bourgeois, the petty bourgeois. Thus, the whole historical movement is concentrated in the hands of the corporates; every victory so obtained is a victory for the corporates.

But with the development of industry, the employees class not only increases in number; it becomes concentrated in greater masses, its strength grows, and it feels that strength more. The various interests and conditions of life within the ranks of the employees are more and more equalised, in proportion as machinery obliterates all distinctions of labour, and nearly everywhere reduces wages to the same low level. The growing competition among the corporates, and the resulting commercial crises, make the compensation of the employees ever more fluctuating. The increasing improvement of machinery, ever more rapidly developing, makes their livelihood more and more precarious; the collisions between individual employee and individual company take more and more the character of collisions between two classes. Thereupon, the employees begin to form combinations (Trades’ Unions) against the corporates; they club together in order to keep up the rate of compensation; they found permanent associations in order to make provision beforehand for these occasional revolts. Here and there, the contest breaks out into riots.

Now and then the employees are victorious, but only for a time. The real fruit of their battles lies, not in the immediate result, but in the ever expanding union of the employees. This union is helped on by the improved means of communication that are created by modern industry, and that place the employees of different localities in contact with one another. It was just this contact that was needed to centralise the numerous local struggles, all of the same character, into one national struggle between classes. But every class struggle is a political struggle. And that union, to attain which […], required centuries, the modern proletarian IT/ITES employees, thanks to Information Technology, achieve in a few years.

This organisation of the IT/ITES employees into a class, and, consequently into a political party, is continually being upset again by the competition between the employees themselves. But it ever rises up again, stronger, firmer, mightier. It compels legislative recognition of particular interests of the employees, by taking advantage of the divisions among the corporate class itself.

The Original Text from Marxists Org

The proletariat goes through various stages of development. With its birth begins its struggle with the bourgeoisie. At first the contest is carried on by individual labourers, then by the workpeople of a factory, then by the operative of one trade, in one locality, against the individual bourgeois who directly exploits them. They direct their attacks not against the bourgeois conditions of production, but against the instruments of production themselves; they destroy imported wares that compete with their labour, they smash to pieces machinery, they set factories ablaze, they seek to restore by force the vanished status of the workman of the Middle Ages.

At this stage, the labourers still form an incoherent mass scattered over the whole country, and broken up by their mutual competition. If anywhere they unite to form more compact bodies, this is not yet the consequence of their own active union, but of the union of the bourgeoisie, which class, in order to attain its own political ends, is compelled to set the whole proletariat in motion, and is moreover yet, for a time, able to do so. At this stage, therefore, the proletarians do not fight their enemies, but the enemies of their enemies, the remnants of absolute monarchy, the landowners, the non-industrial bourgeois, the petty bourgeois. Thus, the whole historical movement is concentrated in the hands of the bourgeoisie; every victory so obtained is a victory for the bourgeoisie.

But with the development of industry, the proletariat not only increases in number; it becomes concentrated in greater masses, its strength grows, and it feels that strength more. The various interests and conditions of life within the ranks of the proletariat are more and more equalised, in proportion as machinery obliterates all distinctions of labour, and nearly everywhere reduces wages to the same low level. The growing competition among the bourgeois, and the resulting commercial crises, make the wages of the workers ever more fluctuating. The increasing improvement of machinery, ever more rapidly developing, makes their livelihood more and more precarious; the collisions between individual workmen and individual bourgeois take more and more the character of collisions between two classes. Thereupon, the workers begin to form combinations (Trades’ Unions) against the bourgeois; they club together in order to keep up the rate of wages; they found permanent associations in order to make provision beforehand for these occasional revolts. Here and there, the contest breaks out into riots.

Now and then the workers are victorious, but only for a time. The real fruit of their battles lies, not in the immediate result, but in the ever expanding union of the workers. This union is helped on by the improved means of communication that are created by modern industry, and that place the workers of different localities in contact with one another. It was just this contact that was needed to centralise the numerous local struggles, all of the same character, into one national struggle between classes. But every class struggle is a political struggle. And that union, to attain which the burghers of the Middle Ages, with their miserable highways, required centuries, the modern proletarian, thanks to railways, achieve in a few years.

This organisation of the proletarians into a class, and, consequently into a political party, is continually being upset again by the competition between the workers themselves. But it ever rises up again, stronger, firmer, mightier. It compels legislative recognition of particular interests of the workers, by taking advantage of the divisions among the bourgeoisie itself.

Read the full text at Marxists Org

Permanent link to this article: http://new-democrats.com/communist-manifesto-for-itites-employees/

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